High Efficiency Cooling in Data Centers PUE about 1,05 – 1,10

A few weeks ago I had the chance to visit a high effiency cooling cell here in Berlin.

Together with Norman Beherzig, who wrote this blog, I want to share with you what I have learned.

If you have more questions, do not hasitate to reach out to me or Norman.

A cooling concept for modular indirect free cooling will be tested in the test data center of dc-ce in the technical University of Berlin

The cooling concept developed by dc-ce RZ-Planung, whose centerpiece is the AirBlock MIFC, allows achieving a high efficiency cooling in new and in existing buildings by optimally combining architecture and technology. This is possible in standard and in high efficiency data centers, which are consuming up to 40 kW per Rack.

The concept can be individually customized to the client needs. The AirBlock MIFC fits optimally in the spatial dimensions and it can also be delivered as Plug&Play solution. The AirBlock consist of reliable and highly available components such as an air-air heat exchanger, modern free controllable EC-Ventilators and other components, which are all exactly coordinated to avoid the pressure deficiency, and thus reducing the energy consumption. All these reasons along with the investment, energy and operation costs as well as the flexibility of the AirBlock MIFC make of it one the most efficient systems available on the market.

During the cooling of data centers most of the energy consumption comes from the mechanical production of cooling and the overcoming of pressure deficiency. Therefore, a high efficiency cooling would be one operating with the lowest pressure deficiency and having most of the time the compressor-based cooling off.

The solution is found in the most important component of the AirBlock MIFC which is a cross flow heat exchanger. It can operate longer than traditional cooling solutions in free cooling mode in temperatures from 10°C up to 12°C. This operation condition is supported by the free controllable EC-Ventilators, which by means of an intelligent control make it possible to always run the AirBlock MIFC exactly with the required air volume.

 

Increasing the Efficiency

The AirBlock MIFC offers a considerable efficiency increase in different areas:

 »» Full power operation in free cooling under appropriate temperatures of the data centers supply air (this value is free to be chosen by the Client) which oscillates in the range of 25°C down to 19°-22°C.

»» 85 % – 90 % free cooling per year according to the location

»» In case of having a partial load of 25% and with an outdoor temperature of around 20°C, only 1% of the IT-Load is required for supplying the cooling. This represents a very good optimization of the partial load behavior of the system.

»» In average only 5 % – 10 % of the IT-Load are required to provide cooling per year. Other modern cooling concepts achieve 20 % – 30 % in average per year while old systems have performances even over 50% of the IT-Load.

Please visit the test data center at the Technical University Berlin. Mr. Norman Beherzig is available for you to arrange your visit at the test data center  – n.beherzig@dc-ce.dewww.dc-ce.de.

 

Microsoft Most Valuable Professional (MVP) – Best Posts of the Week around Windows Server, Exchange, SystemCenter and more – #43

“The Elway Gazette”

Hi Community, here is my compilation of the most interesting technical blog posts written by members of the Microsoft MVP Community. The number of MVPs is growing well, I hope you enjoy their posts. @all MVPs If you’d like me to add your blog posts to my weekly compilation, please send me an email (flo@datacenter-flo.de) or reach out to me via Twitter (@FloKlaffenbach). Thanks!

Featured Posts of the Week!

DMTF – Open Standards Based Management by Jeff Wouters

Windows Server 2012 R2 Unmap, ODX On A Dell Compellent SAN Demo by Didier van Hoye

ODX–Not All SANs Are Created Equally by Aidan Finn

Windows Server 2012 #HyperV – #SCVMM Design – Best Practices #WindowsAzure #Winserv by James van den Berg

Azure

Update System Center and Management related content #sysctr #vmm #configmgr #sco #wap #azure by Robert Smit

Building Windows Azure Pack Into Your Data Center–Part 2 by Lai Yoong Seng

Windows Azure im Überblick-Windows 8 App in German by Toni Pohl

Exchange

 

Events

 

Group Policy

Hyper-V

Auto Failover VM In A Cluster When Network Disconnected by Lai Yoong Seng

The Number 1 Support Call For WS2012 R2 Hyper-V Will Be … by Aidan Finn

How Vulnerable Is Your Hyper-V Server? by Lai Yoong Seng

HYPER-V OVER SMB: SMB DIRECT (RDMA) by Thomas Maurer

Starting an App-V applications asks for username and password by Jeff Wouters

Lync Server

PowerShell module for Lync Online is available by 

Office 

Office 365

Office 365–Benutzer vorzeitig auf die neue Version umstellen in German by Martina Grom

Videocast: Der neuen öffentlichen Webseite eine Domäne zu ordnen in German by Kerstin Rachfahl

PowerShell

DMTF – Open Standards Based Management by Jeff Wouters

#PSTip Tab Completion in PowerShell 3.0 by 

#PSTip Dynamically hiding a function from the debugger in PowerShell ISE by 

Sharepoint 

Deploying Workflow Manager 1.0 for SharePoint 2013 the Right Way by Andrew Connell

System Center Core

 

System Center App Controller

System Center Avisor

 

System Center Configuration Manager

 

System Center Dataprotection Manager

Update Rollup 3 For DPM 2012 SP1 Is Fixed by Aidan Finn

System Center Operations Manager

System Center Orchestrator

System Center 2012 SP1 – Orchestrator: Tools by Damian Flynn

System Center 2012 SP1 – Orchestrator: Runbook Designer by Damian Flynn

Orchestrator Runbook – VHD Rename in German by Daniel Neumann

System Center Service Manager

Links zum Einstieg in die Service Management Automation in German by Daniel Neumann

System Center Virtual Machine Manager

HOW TO INSTALL A HIGHLY AVAILABLE SCVMM MANAGEMENT SERVER by Thomas Maurer

Windows Server 2012 #HyperV – #SCVMM Design – Best Practices #WindowsAzure #Winserv by James van den Berg

SQL Server

 

Windows Intune

 

Windows Client

 

Windows Server Core

What Is Consistent Device Naming? by Aidan Finn

Disable the Integrity Bit of VHDs Copied to an ReFS Volume Using PowerShell by Aidan Finn

ODX–Not All SANs Are Created Equally by Aidan Finn

Reservierte Namen in Windows und Active Directory in German by Nils Kaczenski

What’s New in 2012 R2: Why is it so important for IT Pros to understand how modern applications are built  by Alessandro Cardoso

Windows Server 2012 R2 Unmap, ODX On A Dell Compellent SAN Demo by Didier van Hoye

Tools

 

MVPs I follow

James van den Berg - MVP for System Center Cloud and DataCenter Management
Kristian Nese - MVP for System Center Cloud and Datacenter Management
Damian Flynn - MVP for System Center Cloud and Datacenter Management
Daniel Neumann - MVP for System Center Cloud and DataCenter Management
Marcelo Sinic - MVP for System Center Cloud and DataCenter Management
Stanislav Zhelyazkov - MVP for System Center Cloud and Datacenter Management
Ravikanth Chaganti - MVP for PowerShell
Jan Egil Ring - MVP for PowerShell
Jeffery Hicks - MVP for PowerShell
Keith Hill - MVP for PowerShell
David Moravec - MVP for PowerShell
Aleksandar Nikolic - MVP for PowerShell
 - MVP for PowerShell
Adam Driscoll - MVP for PowerShell
Jeff Wouters - MVP for PowerShell and the man who had his own Newsletter Category before 😉
Marcelo Vighi - MVP for Exchange
Johan Veldhuis - MVP for Exchange
Jaap Wesselius - MVP for Exchange
Lai Yoong Seng - MVP for Hyper-V
Rob McShinsky - MVP for Hyper-V
Hans Vredevoort - MVP for Hyper-V
Leandro Carvalho - MVP for Hyper-V
Didier van Hoye - MVP for Hyper-V
Romeo Mlinar - MVP for Hyper-V
Aidan Finn - MVP for Hyper-V
Carsten Rachfahl - MVP for Hyper-V
Thomas Maurer - MVP for Hyper-V
Alessandro Cardoso - MVP for Hyper-V
Steve Jain - MVP for Hyper-V
Benedict Berger - MVP for Hyper-V
Nils Kaczenski - MVP for Hyper-V
Alessandro Pilotti - MVP for Hyper-V
Susantha Silva - MVP for Hyper-V
Niklas Akerlund - MVP for Hyper-V
Robert Smit - MVP for Cluster
Ramazan Can  - MVP for Cluster
Michael Bender - MVP Windows Expert-IT Pro
Ulf B. Simon-Weidner - MVP for Windows Server - Directory Services
Meinolf Weber - MVP for Windows Server - Directory Services
John Policelli - MVP for Windows Server - Directory Services
Kerstin Rachfahl - MVP for Office 365
Martina Grom - MVP for Office 365
Nick Whittome - MVP Small and Medium Business
Matthias Wolf - MVP Group Policy
Robert Mühsig - MVP ASP.NET/IIS
Thorsten Hans - MVP Sharepoint
Andrew Connell - MVP Sharepoint
Toni Pohl - Client Development
Hasitha Willarachchi - Enterprise Client Management
David O'Brien - Enterprise Client Management
Chris Nackers - Enterprise Client Management
Marc van Eijk - Windows Azure

Why my MVP Newsletter is now named “The Elway Gazette”

One of my readers asked me in the last days why my MVP Posts of the Week are now named “The Elway Gazette”.

Yes funny story. There was a week where I had 90% of the post in the newsletter written by Aidan Finn. His twitter name is @Joe_Elway.

So I reached out to him.

tweet1

As answer on this post Didier van Hoye (@WorkingHardinIT) invented the name.

tweet2

 

So now Aidan’s reaktion 😉 … I think he liked it.

tweet3

 

Ah and if you are looking for god, he is working hard in IT! 😀 

tweet4

Microsoft Most Valuable Professional (MVP) – Best Posts of the Week around Windows Server, Exchange, SystemCenter and more – #42

“The Elway Gazette”

Hi Community, here is my compilation of the most interesting technical blog posts written by members of the Microsoft MVP Community. The number of MVPs is growing well, I hope you enjoy their posts. @all MVPs If you’d like me to add your blog posts to my weekly compilation, please send me an email (flo@datacenter-flo.de) or reach out to me via Twitter (@FloKlaffenbach). Thanks!

Featured Posts of the Week!

Building Windows Azure Pack Into Your Data Center–Part 1 by Lai Yoong Seng

Fixing A Little Quirk In Dell Compellent Replay Manager by Didier van Hoye

System Center 2012 SP1 – Orchestrator: Installation by Damian Flynn

PowerShell – Find disabled Group Policy Objects by Jeff Wouters

Azure

Download Free E-Book Building Hybrid Applications in the #Cloud on #WindowsAzure by James van den Berg

Microsoft Data Management Gateway for #Cloud Services #WindowsAzure by James van den Berg

Microsoft #WindowsAzure Pack for Windows Server #Winserv #sysctr #Cloud by James van den Berg

Explaining Windows Azure Hyper-V Recovery Manager by Lai Yoong Seng

Building Windows Azure Pack Into Your Data Center–Part 1 by Lai Yoong Seng

 by Kristian Nese

Exchange

Exchange 2010 SP3 Rollup 2 released by Johan Veldhuis

Events

MARK YOUR CALENDARS FOR WINDOWS 8.1, WINDOWS SERVER 2012 R2 AND SYSTEM CENTER 2012 R2 by Thomas Maurer

Group Policy

Hyper-V

Understanding Hyper-V Host Networking Requirements by Aidan Finn

Introducing Converged Networks by Aidan Finn

HYPER-V OVER SMB: SMB MULTICHANNEL by Thomas Maurer

Software Defined Networking (SDN) by Lai Yoong Seng

Lync Server

 

Office 

Office 365

 

PowerShell

#PSTip Identifying DSC commands by 

#PSTip Get the fully qualified path of the system directory by 

PSharp makes PowerShell ISE better by 

Announcing PoshTools – Visual Studio extension for PowerShell Scripting by Ravikanth Chaganti

#PSTip Validate if a user exists in Active Directory by Ravikanth Chaganti

PowerShell – Find disabled Group Policy Objects by Jeff Wouters

Sharepoint 


System Center Core

 

System Center App Controller

System Center Avisor

 

System Center Configuration Manager

 

System Center Dataprotection Manager

 

System Center Operations Manager

System Center Orchestrator

System Center 2012 SP1 – Orchestrator: Installation by Damian Flynn

System Center 2012 SP1 – Orchestrator: Server Components by Damian Flynn

System Center Service Manager

System Center Virtual Machine Manager

 by Kristian Nese

SQL Server

#PSTip Add a SQL login to database roles using SMO by Ravikanth Chaganti

#PSTip Validate if a SQL login exists using PowerShell by Ravikanth Chaganti

Windows Intune

 

Windows Client

 

Windows Server Core

 

Welchen DNS-Server fragt Windows eigentlich? in German by Nils Kaczenski

Hands on with Hyper-V Clustering Maintenance Mode & Cluster Aware Updating TechNet Screencast by Didier van Hoye

Dynamische VHDs & CSV Overcommitment in German by Daniel Neumann

Tools

Fixing A Little Quirk In Dell Compellent Replay Manager by Didier van Hoye

MVPs I follow

James van den Berg - MVP for System Center Cloud and DataCenter Management
Kristian Nese - MVP for System Center Cloud and Datacenter Management
Damian Flynn - MVP for System Center Cloud and Datacenter Management
Daniel Neumann - MVP for System Center Cloud and DataCenter Management
Marcelo Sinic - MVP for System Center Cloud and DataCenter Management
Stanislav Zhelyazkov - MVP for System Center Cloud and Datacenter Management
Ravikanth Chaganti - MVP for PowerShell
Jan Egil Ring - MVP for PowerShell
Jeffery Hicks - MVP for PowerShell
Keith Hill - MVP for PowerShell
David Moravec - MVP for PowerShell
Aleksandar Nikolic - MVP for PowerShell
 - MVP for PowerShell
Adam Driscoll - MVP for PowerShell
Jeff Wouters - MVP for PowerShell and the man who had his own Newsletter Category before 😉
Marcelo Vighi - MVP for Exchange
Johan Veldhuis - MVP for Exchange
Jaap Wesselius - MVP for Exchange
Lai Yoong Seng - MVP for Hyper-V
Rob McShinsky - MVP for Hyper-V
Hans Vredevoort - MVP for Hyper-V
Leandro Carvalho - MVP for Hyper-V
Didier van Hoye - MVP for Hyper-V
Romeo Mlinar - MVP for Hyper-V
Aidan Finn - MVP for Hyper-V
Carsten Rachfahl - MVP for Hyper-V
Thomas Maurer - MVP for Hyper-V
Alessandro Cardoso - MVP for Hyper-V
Steve Jain - MVP for Hyper-V
Benedict Berger - MVP for Hyper-V
Nils Kaczenski - MVP for Hyper-V
Alessandro Pilotti - MVP for Hyper-V
Susantha Silva - MVP for Hyper-V
Niklas Akerlund - MVP for Hyper-V
Robert Smit - MVP for Cluster
Ramazan Can  - MVP for Cluster
Michael Bender - MVP Windows Expert-IT Pro
Ulf B. Simon-Weidner - MVP for Windows Server - Directory Services
Meinolf Weber - MVP for Windows Server - Directory Services
John Policelli - MVP for Windows Server - Directory Services
Kerstin Rachfahl - MVP for Office 365
Martina Grom - MVP for Office 365
Nick Whittome - MVP Small and Medium Business
Matthias Wolf - MVP Group Policy
Robert Mühsig - MVP ASP.NET/IIS
Thorsten Hans - MVP Sharepoint
Andrew Connell - MVP Sharepoint
Toni Pohl - Client Development
Hasitha Willarachchi - Enterprise Client Management
David O'Brien - Enterprise Client Management
Chris Nackers - Enterprise Client Management
Marc van Eijk - Windows Azure

Microsoft Masterminds Episode 11: Didier van Hoye MVP Virtual Machine on “Windows Server 2012 after 1 year and a look to the future”

A few hours ago I had an very interesting and awesome chat with my good friend Didier van Hoye, also known as @WorkingHardinIT.

Now let me share a few important points we discussed.

This post has no relation to my job or my employer. Everything I post is my personal opinion and I write complete independent.

 

Flo: Hi Didier, in November last year we had our last interview on Windows Server 2012. At this time Windows Server 2012 was pretty new. What do you think, in which ways Microsoft and Windows Server 2012 had changed the datacenter over the past year?

It’s become better and cheaper to do a lot for things. The value in box with Windows is awesome and often provides all one needs in a 80/20 world of good enough is good enough. And don’t dismiss that as SMB/SME plays, or you are dismissing 90% of the market. Unless you’re catering exclusively for the Fortune 100 companies you can’t ignore them. Certainly not while the move to the cloud, which is happening, isn’t going that fast that they have disappeared as customers for vendors. Bar the talk about PRISM putting a cap on cloud growth there is another worry I hear some of the better managers talk about: an exit strategy. They have a fear that the costs in the long run will become (a lot) higher and that they might be locked in. If you don’t need elasticity you might have other options. One of the other reasons I see is 24/7 support. But that only holds true for those companies or organizations that can’t find the skilled personnel or can’t afford to pay (or just won’t). There again they worry about the cost, as even with a cloud vendor this is not cheap and failing hardware, while very real, is rare in a well-run organization and often mitigated by good design principles. Partially it’s fear of the unknown an being lured into something that might bite you in the future. So if, for whatever reason, you need or want to do things on premise, partially or completely, Windows Server 2012 (R2) is what you’ll use. If ISVs are stopping you from doing that, get rid of them, as you’re being held hostage and you should never ever tolerate that.

 

Flo: We were also talking about how Windows Server 2012 influences new Hardware and Infrastructure ideas. From your point of view, did customer adopt this ideas like Cluster in a Box (CiB) or SMB 3 over Infiniband?

Cluster In a Box, yes. I see a keen interest for this in smaller shops, industrial production lines, branch offices or even a building block for lager environments. What’s holding people back is lack of solutions from the OEMs (easy access in existing contracts, established logistics & know support => no fear of the unknown). Once they become available, like DELL’s VRTX, things start moving. And that’s only v1. There is potential there. Mind you, once the smaller new players establish a solid support reputation things can go a bit faster & smoother as well. I see most people thinking of or working at getting 10Gbps. 40Gbps just for the uplinks/interconnects. The next big move in the DC might be 100Gbps. Infiniband, not so much. While cost is actually not that high as one might think there is a bit of a psychological barrier & it is different. But I have spoken to someone who’s doing it in real life and they are not the usual HPC shop.

Flo: When you see the Hardwareideas, do you think the OEM liked this or are they still want to push the “classical” Datacenter environment?

There is always this balance between keeping the order book filled with current & planned offerings versus exploring new ideas, opportunities & technologies. The smart ones will discuss this openly and be quick & agile in introducing some of the new ideas. That way they’ll be considered a conversation partner on these matters. But they’ll also be able to test out these technologies & designs in real life. That means they’ll be a leader when it succeeds while minimizing risk and cost when it doesn’t.

On the one hand I see a lot of vendors focusing on the fortune 500 market. But 90% of the customers are not in that segment and they need to be serviced as well. Good enough is good enough is a very strong principle right now. You have to remember that the question it’s not if smaller startups with new ideas or initiatives like Storage Spaces can match all the bells and whistles of a multi node SAN storage array. It’s if those enterprise storage arrays offer enough value for their price to still be considered. It’s no good having all kinds of fancy replications mechanisms, snapshot capabilities, deduplication & thin provisioning if you can only use one and can’t leverage the other mechanisms or if it conflicts with UNMAP, or CSV etc.

The classical data center environment is not going away that fast but what will the components be? Most vendors are gunning for converged infrastructure combined with software defined everything. Both the hardware & software vendors are in this game and as such entering each other’s realms. Which causes concerns but also creates opportunities. At the moment it’s hard to see a complete data center abstraction layer that is multivendor. It’s hard enough to get it to work with one vendor and they are, in this game, each other’s competition. Interesting times J

 

Flo: As anybody know Windows Server 2012 R2 is comming up. It will be public available on 18. of october. What do you think, will it be the same wallbreaker like Windows Server 2012 or is it a nice to have realease?

That depends on your needs. I you really need features like resizing of VHDX files, yes it makes sense.  If you’re pushing NIC teaming to some of it limits you might be waiting for the new “Dynamic Mode” for load balancing. Compression for Live Migrations is going to be great and people who can’t go to 10GBps yet might very well extend the life of their 1Gbps networks thanks to this. Shared VHDX is a great tool to uphold some sacred boundaries in the data center. vRSS might save you when doing heavy file copies inside of VMs. R2 is bring a lot of enhancements that extend & enrich the capabilities of Windows 2012. It’s up to the user to decide if it’s compelling enough. If you’re still on W2K8R2, well the reasons to make the move, as your infrastructure is aging anyway, just got a whole lot bigger & better. So I never consider a release as nice to have. Some features perhaps yes, but a release, R2 is better in functionality & capabilities. If you’re already rocking Windows Server 2012 I think you should weigh the pros & cons. For what it’s worth, we’ll be upgrading.

 

Flo: Let us take a look on the market shares in virtualization. Microsoft grow from 0% to 38% in the last 5 years since Windows Server 2008. How will it go on, is it the end or is there more space to grow?

Oh yes. Every release it makes more sense for Microsoft shops to ask why they’re using 3rd party product X for again and do these reasons still hold true today. Most of the time we have environments where the rule is to do all you can with in box tools (that are getting better and better) and only use 3rd party products when it really matters & makes a difference. I think they can grab 45 to 50% of the market, mostly at the expense of VMware, clearly as they hold such a huge part of that market.

 

Flo: What is your opinion, how companies like VMware, Redhat and Citrix will go on to position there products in the datacenter? Do you think there is a big badabumm somewhere in the VMware labs, that will give them more opportunities against Microsoft?

Big bangs are relatively rare occasions. Evolution is ever ongoing and can go quite fast given the right circumstances or pressure J

VMware is trying to focus a lot more on their core business. Virtualization. You can’t do that without storage & networking, where they’ve show initiatives. They got rid of Zimbra as evidence of this focus. Cloud wise it might be a more problematic situation. The open source world isn’t idle either and in the public cloud it’s about cost/value and there they might not be in the strongest position. In the datacenter for private could they can put up a good fight but the easy days are over.

Citrix will rule High End VDI for a long time to come it seems. MSFT is missing realistic 3D capabilities for software running OpenGL and that’s a lot of products. Citrix there holds the high ground. For other VDI scenarios, good enough is good enough combined with management & deployment tools that couldn’t care less about whether it’s a physical or virtual machine make Microsoft a more attractive player. The big reasons we see for VDI are often as a solution to business continuity & flex offices, or sometimes data security. If you’re hunting high performance customers it becomes hard to beat a physical workstation with 16GB or RAM, an 8 Core i7 and a couple of SSD disks at an attractive price point. Add replication and/or shared storage to that and the extra costs hit you hard. But again mileage varies between customers & environments and I’m speaking from the GIS/Engineering side of things as that is my current area of operations.

 

Thank you very much for your time Didier and as anytime it was awesome to talk to you. 🙂