Storage Spaces Direct Series Part 2 & 3 via Altaro Blog

Hi everyone,

I want to inform you about my two new blogpots about Storage Spaces Direct that I wrote for Altaro.

In the second post I write about the technologies in focus of S2D

You can find the post by following the link below.

In the third post you will learn the following things:

  • Where Did S2D Come From?
  • Converged vs. Hyper-Converged Infrastructure
  • How to License Storage Spaces Direct

You can find the post by following the link below.

You can post feedback and questions in the comment sections of the Altaro Blogs. 🙂

Cheers,

Flo

Storage Spaces Direct Series Part 1 – What is S2D?

Hey everyone,

today my first blog about gast blog on Altaros Hyper-V Blog was published. It’s the first blog in my storage spaces direct series and should give you a first introduction into S2D.

Please checkout the blog and leave me some feedback in the comments. 🙂

Storage Spaces Direct Series Part 1 – What is S2D?

 

How to configure StorSimple virtual Array – Microsoft Video Series

Hi everybody,

like you already know Microsoft announced a StorSimple virtual Array in December 2015.

This week Program Manager Sharath Suryanaarayan  published a Guide on YouTube about how to configure it. If you are interest in that product, you shouldn’t miss his videos.
Video #01: StorSimple Virtual Array Getting Started

Video #02: StorSimple Virtual Array Create

Video #03: StorSimple Virtual Array Configuration

Video #04: StorSimple Virtual Array Create Shares

Video #05: StorSimple Virtual Array DR

Microsoft Announcing the StorSimple Virtual Array Preview

Hi everybody,

yesterday Microsoft announced the public preview of it’s new StorSimple Virtual Array. For me a great a great fit in Microsoft Cloud and Software defined strategy. The virtual array can operate under Hyper-V or VMware ESXi and work as NAS or iSCSI server to manage up to 64 TB of storage in Azure.

What’s new in the array? (quote from azure.microsoft.com)

Virtual array form factor

The StorSimple Virtual Array is a virtual machine which can be run on Hyper-V (2008 R2 and above) or VMware ESXi (5.5 and above) hypervisors. It provides the ability to configure the virtual array with data disks of different sizes to accommodate the working set of the data managed by the device. A web-based GUI that provides a fast and easy way for initial setup of the virtual array.

Multi-protocol

The virtual array can be configured as a File Server (NAS) which provides ability to create shares for users, departments and applications or as an iSCSI server (SAN) which provides ability to create volumes (LUNs) for mounting on host servers for applications and users.

Data pinning

Shares and volumes can be created as locally-pinned or tiered. Locally-pinned shares and volumes give quick access to data which will not be tiered, for example a small transactional database that requires predictable access to all data. These shares and volumes are backed up to the cloud along with tiered shares and volumes for data protection.

Data tiering

We introduced a new algorithm for calculating the most used data by defining a heat map which tracks the usage of files and blocks at a granular level. This assigns a heat value to the data based on read and write patterns. This heat map is used for tiering of data when the local tiers are full. Data with lowest heat value (coldest) tiers to the cloud first, while the data with higher heat value is retained in the local tiers of the virtual array. The data on the local tiers is the working set which is accessed frequently be the users. The heat map is backed up with every cloud snapshot to the cloud and in the event of a DR, the heat map will be used for restoring and rehydrating the data from the cloud.

Item level recovery

The virtual array, configured as a file server, provides ability for users to restore their files from recent backups using a self-service model. Every share will have a .backups folder which will contain the most recent backups. The user can navigate to the desired backup and copy the files and folders to restore them. This eliminates calls to administrators for restoring files from backups. The virtual array can restore the entire share or volume from a backup as a new share or a volume on the same virtual appliance.

Backups

 

If you want to try out the preview or get more insides please click here.

How to plan redundancy for Scale out Fileser

Hey everybody,

after I posted some of my thoughts I normally put behind Hyper-V redundancy, today I want to show you some examples how you could plan redundancy for Scale out Fileserver.

When to choose a redundancy where only one or two cluster nodes can fail?

That is the most common and easiest why for node redundancy in a cluster. It means you have enough nodes in your cluster to cover one or two node failures. You would choose that cluster config when all of your nodes are in one datacenter or server room and you need no geo-redundant storage solution. Please notice, for a JBOD based Scale out Filserver you need at least a minimum of three JBODs. For converged Scale out Fileserver with Windows Server 2016 you will need 4 equal Scale out Fileserver Systems.

Sofs01

Traditional Scale out Fileserver with Storage Spaces and JBODs

sofs02

Traditional Scale out Fileserver with SAN Storage Backend

sofs03

Scale out Fileserver with Storage Spaces Direct in Windows Server 2016

When to choose a redundancy where you can choose half of the nodes?

In this scenario you can lose one half of your nodes but you need to fulfill some more requirements like storage replications or direct WAN links. You would normally use if you want to keep your services alive if one datacenter or serverroom fails.

sofs04

With Storage Spaces Direct in Windows Server 2016 and RDMA RoCE

sofs05

Scale out Fileserver with classic SAN storage replication